Naval Station Everett, NAS Whidbey Island Commemorate Pearl Harbor Day

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OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Members of North Cascades Chapter 5 show their respect during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Members of North Cascades Chapter 5 show their respect during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Sailors assigned to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) color guard present colors at a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on NASWI. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Sailors assigned to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) color guard present colors at a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on NASWI. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Cecil Calavan, a Pearl Harbor survivor from USS Utah (BB-31), spoke during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Cecil Calavan, a Pearl Harbor survivor from USS Utah (BB-31), spoke during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Cecil Calavan, a Pearl Harbor survivor from the battleship USS Utah (BB-31), salutes the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) color guard as they present colors during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on NASWI. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Cecil Calavan, a Pearl Harbor survivor from the battleship USS Utah (BB-31), salutes the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) color guard as they present colors during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on NASWI. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings/Released)

EVERETT, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Master-at-Arms 1st Class Joseph Reyes and Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mathew Wilkinsen carry a wreath to be laid in honor of the victims of the Pearl Harbor attack during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on Naval Station Everett. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Americans who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Jeffry Willadsen/Released)

EVERETT, Wash. (Dec. 6, 2013) Master-at-Arms 1st Class Joseph Reyes and Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mathew Wilkinsen carry a wreath to be laid in honor of the victims of the Pearl Harbor attack during a Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony on Naval Station Everett. The ceremony honored the 2,403 Americans who died during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Jeffry Willadsen/Released)

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Naval Station Everett Remembers Pearl Harbor

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Everett

EVERETT, Wash. – Sailors and DoD civilians remembered those who fought and died during the attack on Pearl Harbor with a ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom on Naval Station Everett (NSE), Dec. 6.

The ceremony, marking the 72nd anniversary of the historic attack, included a moment of silence, a wreath-laying, guest speakers and a “walk of honor” for attending veterans.

“Freedom has a price, and each generation pays its dues. Today, we remember those who paid the ultimate price on that Sunday morning 72 years ago,” said Capt. James Duke, Naval Station Everett commanding officer. “World War II American veterans were heroes who fought, suffered and died to free the world from the pith black night of war and oppression … let us take strength from their example, and wisdom from their history.”

On the morning of December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy unleashed a surprise attack from the air over the Naval Base at Pearl Harbor. The bombing ignited war between the U.S. and Japan, and brought America into World War II.

The attack seriously damaged the strength of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, with 18 American ships being sunk or run aground, five of them battleships, and 2,403 Americans perished during the attack.

Emily Soals, daughter of a Pearl Harbor Survivor, was one of the guest speakers at the event. Her father, Woodrow Wilson Soals, was assigned to the battleship USS Maryland (BB 46) on the morning of December 7. Soals read from her father’s account of that day during the ceremony.

Soals’ father and some shipmates were returning from liberty when the attack started.

“’As we got close to the bay, we saw the first wave of planes dropping bombs,” said Soals, reading from her father’s account. “’My shipmates and I grabbed the first launch boat we could find, getting to the ship as fast as we could.

“’I started climbing up the nets on the side of the ship,” she said from her father’s account. “I was halfway up when a bomb hit one of the ships, a piece of shrapnel missing me by only a foot. The shock knocked me into the water … I swam back to the ship, climbed the nets again, manned my battle station, and continued to fight the fight.’”

Soals said that her father later retrieved the piece of shrapnel, which remains in her family to this day.

Two armor piercing bombs hit the Maryland during the attack. The ship returned to service in 1942.

“Today I salute my dad and all World War II veterans who fought to keep our country safe,” said Soals.

Dozens of military veterans attended the event, including several World War II veterans and Pearl Harbor survivors.

“The first experience was not shock, it was surprise,” said Ervin Schmidt, a Pearl Harbor survivor who attended the event. “I was surprised like you wouldn’t believe.”

Schmidt was on board the battleship USS California (BB 44) during the attack. He manned a .50 cal. anti-aircraft gun and fired at the attacking Japanese aircraft.

When asked what encouraged him that day Schmidt said, “The flag was still flying. We were going to recover it real quick, once they stopped shooting at us … it was quite a day.”

NASWI Remembers Pearl Harbor

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Whidbey Island

OAK HARBOR, Wash. – Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI), Electronic Attack Squadron 129 (VAQ-129), the Pearl Harbor Survivors’ Association, and North Cascades Chapter 5 honored those killed at Pearl Harbor 72 years ago during a commemoration ceremony, Dec. 6.

VAQ-129 hosted the Pearl Harbor Day Commemoration Ceremony at the PBY Memorial Foundation and Navy Heritage Center on the NASWI Seaplane Base, in remembrance of the attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941.

Capt. Michael Nortier, NASWI commanding officer, said NASWI was honored to have the survivors at the ceremony.

“We have just a few of the brave souls here today that defended our nation,” Nortier said. “In Pearl Harbor they were like today’s Sailors; we have the finest men and women deployed defending our nation.”

At the time of the attack Calavan was on the former battleship USS Utah (BB-31). It was the first ship attacked by the Japanese and the wreckage is still visible in the harbor.

“What made me angry is the Japanese knew we were there and their torpedoes sank us within 15 minutes,” Calavan said. “We weren’t prepared; over 2,000 young men died that day and it’s because we weren’t alert and ready. We can’t let that happen again.”

National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, which is observed annually on Dec. 7, is to remember and honor all those who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

“I was laying in a ditch,” Calavan said. “One of the nicest things about being 17 was I didn’t realize the great danger I was in from being in a ditch. I just knew I was scared.”

Calavan said that the day after the attack they had to pull the bodies out of the water. Most of the bodies had no identification and they had to cut their jaws out of their mouth to identify the bodies.

“I grew up a little that day,” Calavan said. “The next day I really grew up.”

Gayle Vyskocil, a member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors’ Association, laid a wreath outside the base of the USS Arizona memorial. The wreath honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to their country. Sailors and attendees also laid carnations over the wreath showing their respect.

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